‘We all need to do more’


Editor:

I am again writing to discuss Ohio’s opiate epidemic. Each week, we continue to see rashes of overdose deaths in communities throughout Ohio and right here in our county. A new variation of heroin or fentanyl shows up and the number of overdose and deaths spike.

We recognize that our federal, state and local leaders have put forth a variety of efforts to address this epidemic, but collectively we have not yet done enough. People throughout Preble County, our state and our nation keep dying.

We all need to do more. We need to educate individuals about addiction, we need to treat individuals with addiction, we need to support families impacted by addiction, and we need to remind people that there is hope, that treatment works and recovery is possible.

We need to ensure access to treatment in real-time. We need to put harm reduction programs in place. We must educate all Ohioans about this epidemic, about addiction, about treatment, and how to get help. We must talk about how addiction is a chronic disease of the brain and how treatment works and people recover.

Preble County residents who need help can reach out to our network of care providers, which include outpatient treatment agencies, Recovery & Wellness and Samaritan Behavior Health, and residential provider, Sojourner Recovery Services. You may also call our office at 937-456-6827.

Preble County Mental Health & Recovery Board has partnered with county offices, providers and agencies to provide treatment services within our jail. We also partner to provide prevention education in our county schools. Additionally, we are a part of our drug coalition, Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership which includes our local churches, community leaders and impassioned residents to provide community education events. We support our Emergency Department to provide assistance with individuals and families that have suffered an overdose. Help is available.

Elizabeth Murphy

Community Outreach

Preble County Mental Health & Recovery Board