Census Bureau highlights Women’s History Month


From U.S. Census Bureau



UNITED STATES — National Women’s History Month traces its roots to March 8, 1857, when women from various New York City factories staged a protest over poor working conditions.

The first Women’s Day celebration in the United States was in 1909, also in New York City. More than seven decades later, Congress in 1981 established National Women’s History Week to be commemorated annually the second week of March.

In 1987, Congress expanded the week to a month and every year since has passed a resolution (and the president has issued a proclamation) designating March Women’s History Month.

As we celebrate Women’s History Month 2022, we reflect upon advances women have made over the last decade. Women have increased their earnings, education and fields of occupation, and continue to have longer average life spans than men.

Below are some Census Bureau stats highlighting these and other changes over the years. The Census Bureau appreciates the public’s cooperation in helping us measure America’s people, places and economy.

Did You Know?

164.8 million — The number of females of all ages in the United States. There were 159.9 million males of all ages.

Source: 2019 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

2 to 1 — The approximate ratio of women to men ages 85 and older (4.1 million to 2.2 million) in the United States.

Source: 2019 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

20.7 percent — In 2019, the percentage of women 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree as their highest degree; 19.9 percent of men had a bachelor’s degree as their highest degree.

Source: 2019 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

80.8 percent — Women’s median earnings as a percentage of men’s median earnings, for full full-time, year-round workers 16 years and older.

Source: 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates

From U.S. Census Bureau